Caught in a perpetual zoom

escapekit:

Stars Bursting In The Night Sky

Australian photographer Lincoln Harris collection ‘Star trails’, surreal swirls in the sky, created from a multitude of long-exposure shots and the effect of the Earth’s rotation. 

(via frustrationincorporated)

astronomypictureoftheday:

 A Colorful MoonThe Moon is normally seen in subtle shades of grey or yellow. But small, measurable color differences have been greatly exaggerated to make this telescopic, multicolored, moonscape captured during the Moon’s full phase. The different colors are recognized to correspond to real differences in the chemical makeup of the lunar surface. Blue hues reveal titanium rich areas while orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron. The familiar Sea of Tranquility, or Mare Tranquillitatis, is the blue area in the upper right corner of the frame. White lines radiate across the orange-hued southern lunar highlands from 85 kilometer wide ray crater Tycho at bottom left. Above it, darker rays from crater Copernicus extend into the Sea of Rains (Mare Imbrium) at the upper left. Calibrated by rock samples from the Apollo missions, similar multicolor images from spacecraft have been used to explore the Moon’s global surface composition. Image Credit & Copyright:  László Francsics

astronomypictureoftheday:

A Colorful Moon

The Moon is normally seen in subtle shades of grey or yellow. But small, measurable color differences have been greatly exaggerated to make this telescopic, multicolored, moonscape captured during the Moon’s full phase. The different colors are recognized to correspond to real differences in the chemical makeup of the lunar surface. Blue hues reveal titanium rich areas while orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron. The familiar Sea of Tranquility, or Mare Tranquillitatis, is the blue area in the upper right corner of the frame. White lines radiate across the orange-hued southern lunar highlands from 85 kilometer wide ray crater Tycho at bottom left. Above it, darker rays from crater Copernicus extend into the Sea of Rains (Mare Imbrium) at the upper left. Calibrated by rock samples from the Apollo missions, similar multicolor images from spacecraft have been used to explore the Moon’s global surface composition.

Image Credit & Copyright: László Francsics

In civilization there is a vast overwhelming whimper to be secure, sheltered, cared for. But if you refuse danger too much, you refuse life.

—Lois Crisler “Arctic Wild” 

Somewhere to the eastward a wolf howled; lightly, questioningly. I knew the voice, for I had heard it many times before. It was George, sounding the wasteland for an echo from the missing members of his family. But for me it was a voice which spoke of the lost world which once was ours before we chose the alien role; a world which I had glimpsed and almost entered…only to be excluded, at the end, by my own self.

—Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf (via besik)

There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.

—Jack London, The Call of the Wild (via bookmania)

That is a happiness all but unknown any longer, to be accepted fearlessly by wild creatures. To a city person it may seem like a slight thing. It wasn’t. If you stay in the wilderness a long time, you get to feeling like a pariah: every living thing shuns you. The shadow of human cruelty covers Earth. Unnoticed, it darkens the spirits of humans themselves.

—Lois Crisler, “Artic Wild”